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The Sutherland Collection

Documents for the history of the collection

1809

Thomas Frognall Dibdin, The Bibliomania; or, Book-Madness; containing some account of the history, symptoms, and cure of this fatal disease. In an epistle addressed to Richard Heber, Esq. London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme: 1809. Pp. 62-3. N.b. no guarantee that this refers to the Sutherland Clarendon.

Illustration was the order of the day; and Shakspeare (51) and Clarendon (52) became the next objects of [63] its attack.

[63] (52) I have heard of an illustrated Clarendon (which was recently in the metropolis), that has been valued at 5000 Guineas! "a good round sum!"


1812 May 26

Letter from Sir Henry Dampier to the Rev. Thomas Frognall Dibdin, regarding the disposal of the library of the late Dr Dampier, Bishop of Ely, Sir Henry's half-brother, published in Dibdin, Bibliographical Decameron, vol. III, pp. 349-50, quoting from p. 350.

The late Bishop had a large Collection of Prints, which are, I believe, of great value. What he collected himself were principally English Portraits, and I believe there is a Granger complete; some came to him from my father: there are some very good Nantueil's and a large collection of Rembrandts. I have no sort of knowledge on this subject, and I understand you have. They are directed to be sold: I have been recommended to a man of the name of Philippe, in Golden Square. Mr. Sutherland of Gower-Street, who is very learned in Prints, says he should prefer a Mr. Dod who lives in St. Martin's Lane.


1819

Repertorium Bibliographicum; or, some account of the most celebrated British libraries. London: William Clarke, New Bond Street. MDCCCXIX. Pp. 577-8.

Clarendon's (Edward Earl of,) History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, illustrated with upwards of 5,800 prints and original drawings; and bound in 31 vols. imperial folio in russia. Oxford, 1703, &c. Mr. Sutherland.

† In these volumes are dispersed several extremely rare portraits; our limits confine us to the notice of an unique print or two, and a fine proof of
William, Marquis of Newcastle, his marchioness, and their family, after Diepenbeke, by Clouvet.
George, Earl of Buckingham, &c. 1617, by Simon Passe. An im[578]pression of this beautiful portrait is in the British Museum; and another in the possession of Earl Spencer.
Philip IV. of Spain, and Charles, Prince of Wales, whole lengths, (twelve English verses,) are to be sold at the Globe, over against the Exchange: in the style of Wierix. Unique.
Maria of Austria, Infanta of Spain, sister of Philip IV. On horseback, under an arch; feather fan and plumes; with arms and medallions, representing the several marriages between England and Spain. Unique.


Before 1820 May 19

Bound in to the printed catalogues as p. xv, in a printed facsimile of his autograph, Alexander Hendras Sutherland's statement of his intentions regarding the Collection's future.

Alexander Hendras Sutherland
N.o. 23. Gower Street …

I decidedly forbid that they should ever be broken up, or separated - but that they should be improved as occasion may offer, my ambition having been to make a complete rational [?] work of it -

Alex.r Hen.s Sutherland


Before 1820 May 19

A page of MS. by Charlotte Sutherland, bound into Sutherland 1 immediately following the above. (A negative print of this is tipped into Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, at fol. 21r.; it is repeated, with very minor variations, in a similar note in Charlotte Sutherland's hand bound into Sutherland 4, in the same place.)

The foregoing Memorandum, which as it appears in the Autograph is scarcely consistent with what is said in the Preface, concludes as follows

I permit my wife dispose [sic] of the Books to Government, or to any Public or Nobleman's Library, on condition of not breaking up, but adding to, & improving them. Should my wife be able to dispose of them as directed, the sum she may receive for them is to be invested in the funds or other good security, she receiving the income it may produce - &c. A.H.S.

I consider this paper merely as a memorandum, and for my wife to be acquainted what my intentions and wishes are - but unless I make it clearly and distinctly a codicil to my Will, I desire it may not be admitted to proof, but that my Will, dated &c. &c. alone, may be proved as my last Will & Testament - hoping only, that my wife will conform as much as she can with convenience to herself, to my wishes A.H.S.

In M.r Sutherland's Will the Books are not mentioned. C.S.


1820

'Obituary', The Gentleman's Magazine: and Historical Chronicle. From January to June, 1820. Volume XC. (Being the Thirteenth of a New Series.) Part the First, pp. 563-574; p. 570.

May 21.

[…]

In Gower-street, Bedford-square, Alexander Hendras Sutherland, esq. F.S.A.


1822

Books, and Pictures, at Althorp; the Residence of George John Earl Spencer, K.G. to which is added A Supplement to the Bibliotheca Spenceriana. By the Rev. Thomas Frognall Dibdin, F.R.S. S.A. London: Printed by W. Nicol, Shakspeare Press, and sold by Payne and Foss, Longman, Hurst and Co. J. and A. Arch, R.H. Evans, R. Triphook, and John Major. 1822. Vol. I, pp. 233-4, regarding Lord Spencer's Grangerized Clarendon.

The form of this impression being the large paper octavo, recently printed at the University of Oxford, it has uniformly been his Lordship's object to obtain only those engravings which could be adapted to the size of the printed page—without folding, or much cutting down. The text therefore is not inlaid, and thereby made to become the vehicle of a larger set of volumes—as may be seen in the matchless copy, of this description, which was in the possession of the late Mr. Sutherland.*

Although such a plan as the present, when compared with that of Mr. Sutherland, would necessarily deprive the volume of a great number of magnificent, and curious embellishments, yet, at the same time, it has [234] not led to the exclusion of a great number, which are not less distinguished for brilliancy of execution and rarity of occurrence.

* This copy is briefly noted in the Bibliomania, p. 668.


1831

Bound into Sutherland 82 (the first volume of the extra-illustrated Life and Times of Frederick Reynolds), facing the title-page, in Mrs Sutherland's MS.

A Lady's Apology

Entire solitude in a very confined & remote lodging - A heavy fall of snow, by which the roads were rendered impassable - A very scanty stock of Books, & a circulating Library affording none which were readable - These circumstances, if they cannot justify, may serve to excuse, the taste of a Lady who was able to find amusement in illustrating a work devoid of any recommendation, save that of being a convenient vehicle, for the introduction of the only class of Prints, which had not previously found a place in an already large Collection

C.S. 1831


1837 May 3

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 2.

Mrs.Sutherland's Compts. to Dr.Bandinel – she places the enclosed in his hands, to be presented to the proper authorities.

Mrs.Sutherland will be to-morrow at the King's Arms, &will leave Oxford very early on Friday morning.

Wednesday, May 3d

[v]

Rev.d B. Bandinel, D.D. &c
Bodleian Library

[Sealed in black wax with Charlotte Sutherland's arms (i.e. those of her husband, in a lozenge).]


1837 May 3

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to the Curators of the Bodleian Library. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 3.

Mrs. Sutherland proposes to place in the Bodleian Library a Collection of 18700 Prints & Drawings – an Illustration of Clarendon and Burnet's histories in 61 Volumes – on the following conditions, on which alone she can resign the Books, and which she imagines the Curators will find neither unreasonable nor irksome

The Collection not being at present in so perfect a state as Mrs. Sutherland desires it should be before she presents it, it must remain in her possession for a few months longer, but it will become the property of the University, from the time that the Curators of the Bodleian [2r] Library signify their acceptance of the terms proposed. About Christmas next, Mrs. Sutherland hopes the Volumes will be complete, and ready to be placed removed to their final resting place.

On the subject of the packing &c. of the Collection, as well as some points connected with it's [sic] future well-being, Mrs. Sutherland trusts that the suggestions she may at a future time offer, will not be altogether disregarded.

The following list includes the whole of the Gift proposed

[2v]

For the Curators
Bodleian Library


1837 May 4

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 3. (William Hussey is William Law Hussey, the son of Charlotte Sutherland's brother William.)

Mrs. Sutherland is extremely sorry that she neglected this morning to repeat to Dr. Bandinel her wish that he should as soon as convenient see the Collection at Merrow – at present the large volumes are in the hands of Mr. Scott in London for rebinding – Early in June he will bring them to Mrs. Sutherland's house, & as soon as the [1v] precise time for his doing so is fixed, Mrs. Sutherland will write to Dr. Bandinel, & as soon after as may be agreeable to himself, she hopes he will allow her the pleasure of introducing him to his future charge –

Mrs. Sutherland intended also to have mentioned to [2r] Dr. Bandinel that if he has any curiosity to see the small edition of the Sutherland Catalogue one a copy is in the possession of her nephew, William Hussey of Ch Ch.

Oxford May 4th

[2v]

Revd. B. Bandinel D.D.
&c. &c.;

[Sealed in red wax with a seal containing a standing horse.]


1837 May 4

(Copy made after 1838 April 24.) Bound into Sutherland 1, following page xiv, in MS. A negative print of this is pasted into Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, fols 3v-6v.

Oxford.
Delegates Room
May 4. 1837.

At a meeting of the Curators of the Bodleian Library, held this day, the following communications from Mrs Sutherland to the Librarian, and to the Curators of the Library were read.

(Copy)

Mrs Sutherland's Compts. to D.r Bandinell - she places the inclosed in his hands, to be presented to the proper authorities. [1v] Mrs Sutherland will be to-morrow at the King's Arms, and will leave Oxford very early on Friday morning.

(dated), Wednesday, May 3. (and
addressed) Rev.d B. Bandinel, D.D. &c
Bodleian Library


(Copy, (inclosed in the preceding))

Mrs Sutherland proposes to place in the Bodleian Library a Collection of 18700 Prints and Drawings - an Illustration of Clarendon and Burnet's histories in 61 Volumes - on the following conditions, on which alone she can resign the Books, and [2r] which she imagines the Curators will find neither unreasonable nor irksome.

The Collection to be known only and always as the Sutherland Collection.

To be preserved entire, and distinct from any other; nothing to be taken from it, nor (except as hereafter expressed) any thing added to it.

To be freely open for inspection, not to the public indiscriminately, but to all persons conversant with, or really interested in its contents, and under such regulations and restrictions as may secure it from injury.

Mrs Sutherland to be allowed at all (reasonable) times free access to the Collection, and in the event (perhaps rather an improbable one) [2v] of her desiring to make any additions to it, she shall be at liberty to do so, and to enter them in the Indices.

With the Collection, and to be considered part of it, a portrait of Mr Sutherland (as its founder) to be received, and placed in a conspicuous situation contiguous to the Books.


The Collection not being at present in so perfect a state as Mrs Sutherland desires it should be before she presents it, it must remain in her possession for a few months longer, but it will become the property of the University, from the time that the Curators of the Bodleian Library signify their acceptance of the terms proposed.

(A. J. Gilbert, Vice Chancellor)

[3r] acceptance of the terms proposed. [sic] About Christmas next, Mrs Sutherland hopes the Volumes will be complete, and ready to be removed to their final resting place.

On the subject of the packing &c of the Collection, as well as some points connected with its' future well-being, Mrs Sutherland trusts that the suggestions she may at a future time offer, will not be altogether disregarded.

The following list includes the whole of the Gift proposed

(addressed) For the Curators
Bodleian Library

Whereupon it was resolved,


After 1837 May 4

Quoted in Macray's Annals (see below).

To Mrs. Sutherland, of Merrow, in the County of Surrey.

Madam,—We, the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford, feel ourselves called upon to acknowledge, in a public and formal manner, the splendid donation recently made by you to our Bodleian Library.

It is doubtless a source of much gratification to us that our University should have been selected by you as the fittest [4] depository of so valuable a collection; but we are not, on that account, less disposed to appreciate and admire the feeling which has led you to make so considerable a sacrifice, and to relinquish the possession of what has been to you, for many years, an object of constant interest and occupation.

We shall prize the matchless volumes about to be committed to our care, not merely as being embellished with the richest specimens of the graphic art, but as possessing a real historical character; as enhancing, in no slight degree, the value of works which we have long been accustomed to regard as most important contributions to the annals and literature of our Country.

Given at our House of Convocation, under our Common Seal, this first day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven.


1837 June 17.

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 7.

Merrow June 17. 1837
[the '7' of '17' overwritten with '6' in paler ink and a different hand]

My dear Sir

At your convenience I shall be happy to see you, & shall have no engagement to interfere with any time which you may hereafter appoint – There is now a coach from Oxford to Guildford – If the University have left me any further wish with respect to the Collection, it is only that some members had seen it. I cannot help feeling now, that I have been highly honoured as donor, while you have still received nothing, & are even without any positive evidence that the Sutherland Collection really exists: it would therefore afford me great satisfaction to have an opportunity of shewing it, to any persons in office, belonging to the University – to any Master – or to any gentleman bringing a line of introduction from yourself – shd. any of them during the summer be in this neighbourhood, & have any curiosity on the subject – I should not however so soon trouble you on this point above; I am desirous that you should be accurately informed what will be the expense of paging a printed Catalogue, & til you are so, I do not put the work actually in hand: I proposed to communicate with you personally, but it is very desirable [1v] if the business is to be done, that it should be commenced with out longer delay – It will be a very laborious & tedious undertaking – it [sic] order to form a judgement of the time it will occupy, I have had some of it done, & by no method of calculation can I bring the time it will occupy within 16 weeks – the lowest price which I have for work is 36/ p.r week, with board – it cannot therefore be less without the board, than two guineas – at that rate, the paying alone, will amount to upwards of 33£ – I have been assured by a friend who is a totally competent judge, that any regular writer, would expect 100£ for the work – & I am in fact convinced that no price, could obtain it unless I constantly superintend and materially assist – I much regret that I cannot undertake the whole of it, since from the trial I have made, (knowing much [?], both Index & Prints) I am convinced that it will be always tedious & very difficult, & often really impossible for a stranger, to find anything from the Catalogue, by means of the manuscript Index: But to enable me to do it, I must detain the Collection from you at least another year, as I have now full occupation, & without devoting myself entirely to the Books, I shall not complete by the end of this year, [2r] all that I have already engaged for – Moreover to say the real truth, I do not believe my health could stand such labour, longer protracted – Tho' [...] I could wish that every part of the work were done by myself – With respect to the point in question, of this expensive affair of the paying, you will be pleased to make your own decision, & when I am informed of it, I will act accordingly. The 4to. Catalogue, will be in two Volumes, a heavy & inconvenient book of reference for you. I have printed an additional title page, to enable you to bind it in three, if you see fit – You will secure in the Collection, at least a hundred more prints more than are mention'd in the Catalogue – some (owing to circumstances beyond my control) have been omitted, some are additions. This lessens the value of the Catalogue, tho' not of the Collection – should the sale of the former give me any encouragement, I shall probably print (without increasing the price,) a supplement of 15 or 20 pages, since beside the prints, I have gather'd much additional information – if I do not print, you shall certainly have the benefit of all this in manuscript, with [2v] your large paper copy of the Catalogue – I am my dear Sir, your [...]
Charlotte Sutherland

Perhaps you will be kind enough to tell Dr. Elleston that I am much flatter'd by his recollection of my call at Magdalen – & obliged for his information – wh is perfectly correct.

My Brother desires me to say, he will be [...] pleased if your arrangements for his friend [...] are such as to allow him the pleasure of seeing him at Merrow this Summer

Revd. B. Bandinel
D.D. &c &c
Oxford

[Sealed in red wax with Charlotte Sutherland's seal (CS in an octagonal frame).]


1837 July

A note by Charlotte Sutherland, given to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 12.



1837 September 16

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 13.

Merrow Sept. 16. 1837

My dear Sir

I much regret the being compelled to inform you, that it will be decidedly impossible for me to put you in possession of the Collection at the time I originally mentioned – so far from the work being completed by Christmas, it appears that it will be scarcely be so by Lady Day – after three months close application on the part of Mr. Scott, sixteen volumes only can be called at all finished, a little remains still undone even to them, & these are some of those to [?] were put in a state of some forwardness last year, & therefore required less than any others; there are still as many as fourteen or fifteen volumes untouched, three & twenty about half done, & the four large ones with much [1v] yet undone. I am much disappointed at being oblig'd to retain the Books so much [...] beyond the period at which I hoped to resign them, but it is really unavoidable; by no means can the work proceed faster, as it can be done by Mr. Scott alone, no other person could now do it as it ought to be done – He will not relax, nor shall I, in the endeavour to be as expeditious as the nature of the work will allow.

You may believe me, when I assure you, that I look forward to no other event with half so much satisfaction, as that of dispatching the Collection to Oxford –

I am, my dear Sir
much yours
Charlotte Sutherland

You will still assure any one, who is very impatient to see the Books, that with the greatest pleasure, I shall shew them at Merrow

[2v]

Revd. B. Bandinel D.D.
&c. &c. &c.
Oxford

[Sealed in red wax with Charlotte Sutherland's 'CS' seal.]


1837 November 8

A Catalogue of Books purchased for the Bodleian Library, with a Statement of Monies received and expended, during the Year ending November 8, 1837, [s.l. (s.n.): s.d.]. Pp. 44-45.

DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY,
Exhibited at the Visitation Nov. 8, 1837.

DONATIONS. DONORS.
[... 45 ...]
Catalogue of the Sutherland Collection. Large paper. 4to. Lond. 1837. } Mrs. Sutherland

1837 November 14

Letter from Arthur Hussey to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 14. Arthur Hussey is Mrs Sutherland's brother Arthur, later curate of Rottingdean (see 1839 February 13), and not to be confused with her nephew the Rev. Arthur Law Hussey. (The specimens referred to are tipped in at fols 8-11.)

Merrow Nov. 14. 1837

My dear Sir

I fear you must have regretted entrusting me with your book, which has not been returned before because Mrs. Sutherland has been too much occupied since I have been at home to attend to the books. However the delay enabled me to send you (on some cancelled leaves) specimens of the paging, & to consult your wishes on the subject. I have finished (with the exception of prints not yet verified) the first volume, but as the work is capable of improvement I propose going over it again, for whh. purpose Mrs. S. allows me a second copy. I will beg the favour of you to examine the specimens, particularly the notes at the bottom, & give me the result of your consideration. Particularly I shall be glad to know whether you prefer the volume Book & volume to be stated in each entry, or the plan suggested in pages 37, 38, & 174.

Mrs. Sutherland feels obliged by the loan of your book, all the prints in which are in the Collection. I regret now that I did not accept your kind offer & bring likewise the Theatrum Tragicum, of the prints in whh. I did not take a list as I fancied I had [1v] done, & am therefore unable to compare them. If not giving you too much trouble I will request the favour of you to send me a list with descriptions & copies of the inscriptions of each.

I remain
Dear Sir
Y.rs truly
Art: Hussey.

P.S. For my own convenience in the paging I shall prefer inserting the volume only once where several prints together are in the same, & can guard against any irregularity in the line of figures (perpendicularly).

[2v]

Revd. Dr. Bandinel


1838 January 9

Letter from Arthur Hussey to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 14. Hussey's brother is presumably Robert Hussey, later Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History.

Tonbridge Jany. 9th., 1838

My dear Sir

I embrace the opportunity of meeting my Brother here to thank you for your letter. I began to be apprehensive that the cause of your silence might be, as it proved, illness, & regretted to hear that such was the case.

Your approval of my work was very satisfactory, though I acknowledge that I am myself not so much pleased with it as I could wish, the materials & the nature of the business necessarily creating considerable [a small deletion] difficulties. I will adopt your suggestion of omitting erasure, & shall be able to simplify likewise the red ink marks.

From your descriptions I have been able to verify the Theatrum Tragicum prints. The Collection contains copies belonging to two different editions of Theat. Trag. Of all the portraits you have mentioned except the Earl of Holland, of whom there is not one of that [1v] set. With regard to the White Hall I am not quite certain, though it appeared probable to both Mrs. Sutherland & myself that there is one in the Collection, which is described in the Catalogue as an "Execution" of Chas. I.st. That the second set came from Theat. Trag. we are informed by Mr. Scott. These prints have Dutch inscriptions, & are very inferior to the others. As far as my recollection served me I should say that your edition contains better [a deleted word] impressions than those in the Collection.

In paging the Catalogue the second time I have noticed the separation in many instances of different states of the same print, which have therefore been brought together (or will be) wherever practicable, whereby Mr. Scott has been provided mith with much additional labour work, which must delay the completion of his labours.

Believe me
Dear Sir
Very truly yrs.
Art: Hussey.

N.B. Very inconvenient to write with frozen fingers.

[2v]

Revd. Dr. Bandinel

[Sealed in black wax, apparently a crest with a seated animal, though not Alexander Hendras Sutherland's crest of a seated cat with one paw raised.]


1838 February 14

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 15.

My dear Sir

For some time I have been intending to write to you, but various causes have prevented me, & indeed I find all my time constantly occupied with matters of more importance to the Collection, than [...] communicating with you about it. After what has been before said, you are hardly expecting to see it at present, but neither are you perhaps, prepared to hear of any still further probable delay as to it's [sic] arrival at Oxford: but this I fear must occur. It had been found absolutely necessary, in order to prevent the volumes from bursting, to inlay between three & four hundred more prints, & in many several instances there are as many as forty leaves in a volume, which from one cause or another, must be taken out & replaced. There are beside, still many hundreds of prints not fixed – yet I have for some time had two Scotts at work. Some additional employment for them has been caused by the regular surveys, which I have made thru' the whole Collection. a great number of alterations in plates has been brought [1v] by this means, as much as many pairs of prints; to put the Collection in a proper state, all the different states must be brought together, as [...] as [...] the pairs; & from what has already been done in this way, a very material improvement is visible since you saw the Books – In order to reconcile you, & thru' you, the University, to this tedious procrastination, I have the pleasure to say, that I have just had the great satisfaction of completing a rare set of prints, by the purchase of one plate, of which I have been many years in search, without having before been able to see it – and I have also, within the last fortnight, placed in the Collection, three prints of extraordinary rarity – indeed I believe quite unknown – There are now in the Volumes, I imagine, some hundreds more prints, than are contained in the Catalogue, tho' I cannot yet mention the precise number. I have, beside these additions, so much very curious matter to mention, that I determined on printing about 90 pages of Supplement to the Catalogue, the M.S. is just completed, & as soon as it is finished, it will [2r] be sent to all persons who have the Catalogue. I am rather annoyed that you can boast of a print not in the Collection, I have not, nor can I procure, the earl of Holland in the Theatrum Tragicum. I will thank you to let me know whether the Bodl. Library has Scott's edition of Preservation of Chs. II after the battle of Worcester, with portraits – only 250 were published – The paging of your Catalogue is now going on well, but it has been a vast work, and there was some difficulty in getting it done quite to my mind – you will let me know whether I understood you right, that you wish to have it bound in 3 vols (I have the titles) in Russia, & gilt – nothing less will save it, my copy is worn at the edges all round already, by the constant reference requir'd for the paging of your's [sic] – The paged cat: by the by, will render my character a service in as much as it will be the means of shewing that the Cat: is not an invention, or at all events a work chiefly of imagination, as I am afraid it is considered to be – The manuscript Indices, you cannot receive with the Collection; first because I shall hardly be able to do my part, (I have to enter about 7000 prints;) & must because they cannot be bound till Scott is at home to do them

You will rejoice that Ladies do not often present to your Bodl. Library, & that therefore you are not often imposed to long letters like this – I cannot however release you till I have told you how sincerely I congratulate myself, tho' I may not congratulate you, that you will remain still at Oxford; it would have been a serious vexation to me, to resign my children at last, to other hands than your's [sic] – My Brother begs his Compts. I am,
My dear Sir, much yours
Charlotte Sutherland

Merrow Feb. 14. 1838

Would it, do you think, be, be likely that the Duke of Wellington would present my Sup. To the Queen – the Cat: was presented to the late King, & Sir D. [?] Taylor had [...] (in April) to acknowledge it, but ~he~~ never did so – I no [sic] otherwise care about it, but that I wish to have a written [...] of its presentation, to put with the others wh. I have recd., in the lar. paper copy wh. Belongs to the Collection


1838 March 15

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 15.

My dear Sir

I beg to be allowed to add this little print to your private collection – I have some pleasure in sending you, before you can have seen it, the first print, certainly so inscribed, & probably the only one that ever will be so – The fact is a little anticipated but it may serve as a kind of earnest that the collection is really intended to be at last, in the Bodleian Library. The gateway is part of the back ground of a long folio of the "Proceeding" of Cath. of Braganza to Hampton Court – the very rare print of a set of seven, which has been from 30 to 40 years one of the great wants of the Collection, & which I only procured about two months since – I can only hear of one other – in the Museum – cut close – ruined [?] – your's [sic] rather, has a splendid margin – [1v] In about three weeks I shall be able to send you the supplemental pages for the Catalogues, they amount to more than I desired, but the contents are very curious, & only yesterday I had to stop the press to insert one of the most curious prints I ever possessed – a very extraordinary & well engraved political caricature dated 1711 on [?] sheet – which has never been mentioned in any catalogue, nor seen or heard of by our oldest printsellers – With this I have finished – the total of the Collection is now 19,046 – wh. I beg you to compare with the former number – from which however, above 200 have from various causes been struck out of the Catalogue – still the total is now so much up –

You will render me a great service if you can inform me what was the precise house & where situated, in which the bargain for Charles was concluded – the Scotch army was [2r] at Newark, & moved back to Nottingham – but the treaty! Was not concluded carried on in either Town, but in a house which stood single, with a small church behind it – There is a view of it which I am told was published in the General Magazine & Impartial review in 4 Vols. only – [...] 1792 – I have the print, but know not how to enter it in the Supplement. I cannot find the Magazine – I have searched Histories, Chronicles, Memoirs, Scott's Novels, where I was told I should find the house mention'd, & even the Parliamentary Records! & all in vain – And I do assure you this little circumstance is a great vexation to me. If you can help me out of the difficulty pray favour me with a line here – where I must remain till the printing is at an end –

I will thank you to let my amiable nephew have the little packet – you have the first impression seen in England [?], he has The second

[2v]

I am, my dear Sir
Much yours
Charlotte Sutherland

The Preservation after the Battle of Worcester shall find its way, with the Collection to the Bodleian

17 Gough Square
Fleet Street Mar 15.

The plate has not been finished as such, why it is noted [?] fancy [?] I know not – there are only 5 impressions taken off on Indian paper

Revd. B. Bandinell D.D.
&c. &c. &c.


After 1838 March 15

A note by Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 12. Bandinel's reference to 'Feb. 14' is, strictly speaking, erroneous – the gift is mentioned explicitly as a postscript to Charlotte Sutherland's letter of 15 March 1838, although the earlier letter does enquire whether the Bodleian has a copy of Scott.

Mrs Sutherlands intentions &c – as communicated to me at various times –

July. 1837 – When I was at Merrow she gave me the following memoranda


Feb. 14 – 1838 – in a letter


1838 April

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 16.

My dear Sir

I have now the pleasure of sending you the Supplement to my Catalogue, to which it is at best, but an incumbrance, however important to the Collection the additions may be – The Collection has been my first object & the Catalogue only the second – I have however the satisfaction of believing that by means of the supplement I have corrected all errors of importance, in the Catalogue – You rendered me a very important service by the trouble you were so good to take about Balderton, you will see that I depend entirely on your information – The Magazine I could not find in the Museum, indeed, between ourselves I never but ever, found there, any book which I was in search of –

I am flattering myself that I can now at [1r] length, see something like an approaching termination of the apparently endless work of the Collection – I hope the Books will be in your hands before Midsummer – I scarcely believe it possible that any thing will now occur to detain them at Merrow beyond the middle of June – The disappointment to me, will be great indeed, if I am not able to dismiss them by that time – As soon as I can know [?] the precise week for this important step, I will write to you.

I send you the Supplement for a copy of the Catalogue which you told me you had purchased; & I likewise trouble you with one for my Nephew – I am,
my dear Sir
much your's [sic]
Charlotte Sutherland

London
April 1838

[2v]

Revd. B. Bandinell D.D.
&c. &c.
Oxford

[Sealed in black wax.]


1838 April 24

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 16. (The copy requested by Charlotte Sutherland of the terms of her gift is presumably that now bound into Sutherland 1, transcribed above under 1837 May 4.)

My dear Sir

I am greatly indebted to you for the trouble which you have taken for me, & only regret that I did not engage your persevering zeal in the cause, in time to avoid the error which stands in the Supplement; but I had not the slightest idea that I should find difficulties absolutely insurmountable in my pursuit of an object so trifling, & apparently so easy of attainment. No one question for the catalogue has given me half so much trouble, as that relating to this very insignificant point.

I do not consider that the account given in the Magazine at all invalidates the assertion of Vickers, nor do I doubt his having correctly dated the treaty: The mistake, as it appears to me, is in the inscription on the plate, which ought to be "The house from which" &c – or "The house in which Charles was confined when" &c. – What the Magazine relates has no reference to the actual treaty for the sale of the royal captive, but simply to the custody of the King's person while the treaty was pending. I shall correct the statement as to the house, &c. of the house , in your copies of the Supplement by means of a M.S. page, which I am obliged to insert by another circumstance also. A few days after the printing of the Supplement was completed, I met with an impression of a sheet print of Charles, which is supposed in it's [sic] usual state to be by Hondius, having the name of V. Quiberon as the engraver, & some other variations, which make it altogether much too curious and interesting to be withheld from the Collection; & it must now of course be added to the paged Catalogue.

I am much disappointed at finding that the [1v] the [sic] Supplement has not yet reached you, I know that it has been some time ready, & can only account for the delay in sending it out, by supposing that Mr. MacDonald's attention is engrossed by the state of his wife's health, which was rather alarming when I left London three weeks since.

The great work of inlaying will finish tomorrow, & when that is once completed, we hope to make rapid progress towards the conclusion of our labours; I am now endeavouring to manage all that depends on me, & have the mortification of finding that I have, (as I believe,) inadvertently destroyed some papers which I intended to preserve, instead of others which I destined for the fire. I can only recount what I am in search of, by your means, & I really feel some shame, while I beg the favour of you to copy for me the terms of my original offer of the Collection to the University. It has always been my intention to bind them with the Catalogue, but by a somewhat careless accident, it is not in my power to do so, without your permission; I venture however to hope that you will indulge me in this point. With the large paper Catalogue which I am to send you, I propose to bind a copy of the remaining part of Mr. Sutherland [sic] memorandum as to his wishes respecting the Collection – in it's [sic] present state, as a document it is very unsatisfactory, tho' as an autograph, it is ample, & interesting – I shall also inlay & bind with this catalogue, the acknowledgements which I have received for the large paper edition – By this hangs a tale as you will find hereafter.

Among the papers which I have so unluckily destroyed are the memorandums of Books, &c., which I have at several [2r] engaged [sic; 'times' missing] to send you with the Collection, I think I have them all in my mind, but for your greater security, I will further trouble you to send me a list, I should be extremely sorry to omit any thing which I have destined for you.

I regret, more than a little, that the plans of Royalty should interfere this year with those of the University, I still propose the Collection should be with you by Mid-summer, & I had pleased myself with the idea of it arriving at a time when it would be received with more than usual [...].

I am
my dear Sir
much yours
Charlotte Sutherland

[2v]

Single Sheet

Revd. B. Bandinell D.D.
&c. &c. &c.
Oxford

[Sealed in black wax with Charlotte Sutherland's arms.]


1838 September 2

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 17.

Merrow Septr. 2d.

My dear Sir

I am not about to say any thing of what you have before heard of [sic], as the Collection – because it is not yet in the course of packing – till it is so. I have promised not to trouble you about it, but I have been for some time proposing to mention [?] you, what you have not yet heard of, as part of the Collection – I had the vexation in the spring of missing a few very curious prints, when the agreement for my having them, was entirely concluded – the owner suddenly changed his mind, & flew off – as nothing could be done with him, I could only regret his fickleness, & I considered the prints as lost – to me, & to Oxford – most unexpectedly, however, they prints have been brought forward & offer'd again – I could not [...] the [...] [1v] pleasure of fulfilling my intention of making them part of the Collection, & they are now placed in the books – In numbers, they are not much, but in rarity they are exquisite! [...] having been seen but as designers – & even then are known to very few persons; they were brought to England about 30 years ago. I have been most carefully [?] locked up ever since – I do not believe that six persons now living ever saw them – About half a dozen may be consider'd decidedly unmatched, in any state – there are other not quite single [...], & proofs & variations which have probably never been seen before – Altogether, I have added about 110, to the number mentioned in the Supplement. The particulars you will soon see, in a few pages which are in the press, I could not have these extraordinary things unrecorded, & they really justify the rather [2r] unusual circumstance of a Supplemental Supplement – I hear that your preparations are made, & that the Collection is likely to be "in very comfortable quarters" – heartily I wish you had it – but till in the mean time I should be much pleased that you could see how exceedingly it has been improved since it was first introduced to you – I wish you would, for want of better employment take a run to Merrow for a few days, & look at it again – [...] in the week beginning with the 17th., I should be most happy to see you – My Brother is about, he has taken [altered from 'taking'] the luxury of Bathing down near Brighton for 3 months, in order to try if his health is yet fit for regular & constant duty in his profession – I am
my dear Sir, much yours
Charlotte Sutherland

[2v]

I have two [...], therefore my house is in even more confusion than you have already seen it in

Revd. B. Bandinell D.D.
&c. &c. &c.
Oxford

[Sealed in red wax with Charlotte Sutherland's initials.]


1838 October 10

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 17.

Merrow Oct. 10.

My dear Sir

I have just learnt that Mr. MacDonald is a candidate for the post of Printer to the University. I neither know with whom the appointment chiefly rests, nor what qualifications are especially requir'd – but I am persuaded that you must have, or ought to have, some weight, & I owe it no less to Mr. MacDonald's character, than to his great attention & kindness to myself, to bear my testimony to the excellence of his moral character. & the soundness of his principles both as to Church & State – I believe him to be a man who is really guided by principle – In his business he is most indefatigable, & devotes himself entirely to it – Of his capabit capabilities in printing, my Cat. is a tolerable proof – [1v] A few lines from me on a different subject are on their way to you, by my nephew who left me on Monday [...]. My dear sir
yours faithfully
Charlotte Sutherland

Mr. MacD is M.A. of Bennet [sic, for Bene't's] – (Corpus I believe now) College Cambridge

[2v]

Revd. B. Bandinell D.D.
&c. &c.
Oxford

[Sealed in red wax.]


1839 February 13

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 18.

Merrow Feb. 13. 1839

My dear Sir

If the shade of Bodley has of late been hovering round your walls & scowling with impatience, bid it now, only wait the Ides (the coming Ides) of March, & it shall be appeased – at length I have the infinite satisfaction of being able to announce that positively (humanly speaking) there will be no further postponement, & ere the next month is out – (I doubt not, ere it be half out) the Collection will be in your hands, & the University will at last have what has now been so long her right – And after so long & so high an expectation, I can say with confidence, that I do not apprehend any disappointment, I feel satisfied that you will find all equal at least to any idea you have formed – I put into your care; I may boldly affirm, the most perfect thing, in it's [sic] kind, that the world can shew – and certainly as far as I ever saw or have been able to hear, the only Collection that ever was really complete – all others have been given or (more generally) left, in much the same state as Mr. Douce's – I may boast (it if be a boasting matter) of being the only Collector who [...] had courage to give up accumulating, & bestow attention on the final arrangement – in fact – to to finish – But all this, tho' true enough, is not what I propose to say to the Bodleian Librarian, when I formally announce the arrival of the Books – tho' I venture to express it now, in writing to Dr. Bandinell – I have not quite completed my arrangements with the carrier, but hope to have done it ere I seal my letters – I propose so to fix the hour of his starting from here, that the Books may [1v] reach Oxford in the early part of the day – if any particular day of the week, will be materially more convenient to you than another, you will be so good as to tell me so – I understand you to say that you would be well pleased that Mr. Scott should accompany the collection, & assist in the unpacking – if such is still your wish, not only he is [sic] willing, but will have much pleasure in attending his Idol, to it's [sic] final resting place – and supposing Mr. S. to go to Oxford, shall you have any objection to the very unassuming and amiable son being there at the same time – on his own account (of course) entirely – he is anxious not only to see Oxford, but to examine some things in the Bodleian (Gough's Topography especially), & elsewhere, & he feels that he never can be there to the same advantage as when his father is introducing the Collection to the Bodleian – If however you disapprove of his appearing, he will on no account introduce himself just now –

I have beside to mention to you, that there is a second copy of the Catalogue paged, & in all respects as perfect as yours, but not being at the beginning so evenly written, I did not like it, & it was laid aside, & another put in hand – But the first has been in all points finished – if you consider it any advantage to possess a second paged copy, you will say so, & take it on exactly your own terms – if you do not desire to have it, it's [sic] future is at present undecided. The supplement, final additions, & the Red Star-ing, &c. have made the paged Cat. very complete, but added greatly to the labour contemplated when the paging was first undertaken In every copy of the Catalogue, in which you have any interest, I have to the last moment – even this very day – added in M.S. every new observation which has occurred as to the alterations, or other curious circumstances relating to the prints, & you will find much information in this way – [2r] I destine for you, as connected with prints in general, & therefore to be considered as belonging to the Collection, the "Catalogue raisonné of an Amateur" – a private work, & very handsomely got up, by Mr. Wilson – a copy which he sent me – Also a Catalogue of the "Cabinet of de Mr.Paignon Dijonval" – and "Liste des Portraits graves des François & Francoises illustres" – it is not likely that you have any either of these – but if you have be pleased to tell me so –

* Milton's head I am sorry to say, I find missing

Have you in the Library – (this will be no part of the Collection) a reprint by Machel Stace, of Burton's Civil Wars, Curiostities of London &c. 1810 2 thick 4to. Vols – 250 copies only – I think I propose sending you a very nice copy if you have it not –

Have you Peck's Memoirs &c. of Milton – and of Cromwell – I have a good Copy, with fine impressions of the plates* – at your service – both bound in 1 Vol. – 1740

Have you Sandford's History of Coronation of James II 1 Lar. fol. Vol. – I [...] that likewise for you, if it is not already on your shelves – when I wish to give you official notice of the day & hour when you are to look for the arrival of the Collection, I shall mention these things altogether – or perhaps not till I actually send them –

The load "The [...] of the whole" as Mr. Jas. [...] says, will be really enormous, both as to bulk & weight – Little less I apprehend than a Ton & half

I have long owed you an apology for the unnecessary trouble I gave you, in copying my first presentation letter, I have with no little satisfaction recovered the original document of the acceptance, not that which I burnt, but the more valuable one signed in Convocation, which I had totally forgotten the having for greater security put by with other important papers in a tin box – I have done much to make the Collection copy of the Lar. pap. Catalogue different from, & more valuable than, that in the Library, & I think you will be pleased with it – It is certainly a happy circumstance for you that a sheet [2v] of paper is not in my hands, as large as a table cloth – I should infallably [sic] send it to you scribbled all over – you have however now the good fortune to behold in prospect the speedy termination of the correspondence. I am
my dear Sir, much yours,
Charlotte Sutherland

My Brother Arthur, being in better health, has been for some months engaged in the curacy of Rottindgean

The Carrier calculates the load at upwards of 2 tons, & I believe he is right – this weight, added to the wagon, will require 3 horses – especially as the first part of the road is very heavy & bad – (for 12 or 16 miles) he undertakes to deliver all safely for 12£ – & will arrive as I propose, early in the day – unless therefore you desire any other plan to be adopted, the matter of the carriage may be considered settled – The measures for cases will be taken about the time that you will receive them. Of the Day, you shall have timely notice.

Feb. 13th. 1839
Revd. B. Bandinell D.D.
&c. &c.
Oxford


1839 February 20

Letter from Charlotte Sutherland to Bulkeley Bandinel. Letters &c. relating to the Sutherland donation, Bodleian Library, Library records c.948, tipped in at fol. 20.

My dear Sir

Since I wrote last, I have met with three or four books, which it is not improbable you may be without, & some of them are valuable on account of their condition, or the state of impression of the plates in them – Some of them you perhaps have: I will give the list, & will thank you to let me know by Wednesday or Thursday next, which among them will be consider'd welcome additions on your Library shelves. They will form a part of the Sutherland Collection – When I dismiss the Colln, I must altogether clear and part with, the Book case in wh. it has so long lain, & of course shall considerably reduce my establishment of Books. I am willing to bestow such of them as [...] any volu[m]e [?], where they will be best placed

Your kind expressions towards my two workmen, are highly gratifying to them, – The elder is fearful of cold in the rain with the Books, but will reach you by coach as soon as they do – the Son will travel with them, & both will be better satisfied that the Collection should thus have a Guard on the road – the Master Man, however of the Carrying business, is to attend the van in person – Your Master Key is the cause of infinite satisfaction to Mr. Scott – as long as the Books are under your care, I for my own part, have no anxious thought about them, & whenever a strong system of defence against improper intruders is established, we may hope it will be persisted in – at all events, you & I, shall not see the mischeif [sic], if any is perpetrated – by [sic] the time will come, when we shall feel the utter nothingness in real worth, even of our Collection – I am rather at a loss how to [1v] reply to your question as to the worth of the paged Catalogue – on one point I can speak very decidedly, viz. that I would much prefer any other person than myself being made the referee – I have never in the most distant manner hinted to my Brother what he might expect for it, nor have I ever asked his own [...]ments on the subject – & moreover, I shall not tell him that the question has been at all referr'd to me – you will therefore be free to act after any suggestions of mine exactly as before – As [?] no work at all like that of the paging was probably ever paid for before, there is no kind of standard to look to – and the fact is certainly that no person of whatever line of business , accustomed to work for hire, would have undertaken it, even if he had been capable – because no one could ever expect any thing like remuneration for the time, & the head [?], as much as patience requir'd – that any one single person unassisted could have done it, is impossible – more than two, were day after day occupied in going from Vol. to Vol. – With this however you have nothing to do, the Work as concerns you is our worth. & the worth of one – I mention these particulars only as they prove the difficulty of estimating the value of what was performed – I will say fairly, tho' I am almost startled at it myself, that I do not think £100 will be anything above the worth of the labour of Cat. Sup. & Fin. Add., completed as they have been – but in this I include the two copies – I have been as I believe honest in my estimate – & I trust you will also be candid [?] enough, if you consider it unreasonable to act on your own better judgement, & take no notice of your appeal to me – I did not desire that Arthur shd. undertake it, tho' I found it quite hopeless to fix on any other person, the only one at all capable wrote such a cramp hand, that his hierogliphics [sic] would only have serv'd to disfigure & blot the pages – & when Arthur did undertake it, it was my earnest wish that he should not let it be known that he was employed; from [2r] his being so closely connected with me – I beg to make it clear, that the second paged Cat., belongs entirely to him; for some time he determined to keep it, that he might boast of that which no one else could shew, but his later, & more prudent resolve has been to give it up, if he found a proper place in which to put it – & he suggested the possibility of your taking it, to avoid the making of a second if your own should wear out, or meet with any accident. Of course it is unbound, & as as there is now not time for the biding, you shall receive it in that state, & if you see fit to put into Mr. Scotts hands, he will do it ample justice – Next week, our packing begins, but our work is not yet by any means complete – it will not however be long ere you hear from me again – A final dispatch

My dear Sir, yours faithfully
Charlotte Sutherland
Merrow Feb. 20.

[All save Fox, Ricraft, the review of Burnet and the Kit Kat Club are marked with a pencil tick in the left margin, presumably Bandinel indicating their presence within the Library already.]

I beg to direct your attention, by & by, particularly to the M.S. additions at the beginning of the 1st. Vol. of the Large paper Catalogue, with the Collection, I think you will approve, & be pleased. If that same Cat. has any value, perhaps Mr. Lodge at his next visit to Oxford, will thank you, as he ought to do, that Cambridge possesses a perfect copy – The original edition of Ten – is reduced to Five – The same sort of spirit and feeling, which prompted me to the Cat. at all, prompted me also to the last (somewhat bold & decided) step, at in the conclusion of it

Feb. 20th. 1839
Revd. B. Bandinell
D. D. &c. &c.
Oxford

[Sealed in red wax with Charlotte Sutherland's 'CS' seal.]


1839

Mrs Sutherland's letter of 3 May 1837 offering the collection (up to '… contiguous to the Books') is reproduced, with minor variations, in her hand on a sheet bound into Sutherland 4 after p. x. This also reproduces the list of works to be included in the gift, but expands upon this in places.

List of the proposed Gift

Dated May 1837. The Collection not sent to Oxford till March 1839

Before the Collection was placed in the Bodleian Library, the number of Prints & Drawings was then increased to 19,223 and the following Books, &c. were added to it.


1839

Bound into Sutherland 1 immediately following the copy of the Cuarators' notes (i.e.following p. xiv), a MS note by Mrs Sutherland.

Altho' presented in May 1837, the Collection was not placed in the Bodleian Library till March 1839

The total of Prints & Drawings was then increased to 19,223 and the following Books, &c., were added to the Collection

C.S. 1839


1839

Bound into Sutherland 4 after the title-page, a MS note by Mrs Sutherland.

Of this edition of the catalogue, Six Copies only are without the Publication, & were thus disposed of – To

This copy, being the only one in three vol.s, belongs to the Compiler


Another Edition of a larger size, was printed solely for presentations, & consisted originally of Ten Copies, but as the Supplement, and the Final Additions were required for only half that number, there are but Five Copies in a complete state. The Presentations were to the following Libraries, those first mentioned, possess the perfect Copies.

C.S. 1839


1843 November 8

A Catalogue of Books purchased for the Bodleian Library, with a Statement of Monies received and expended, during the Year ending November 8, 1843, [s.l. (s.n.): s.d.]. Pp. 55, [61]-62.

DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY,
Exhibited at the Visitation Nov. 8, 1843.

[... 61 ...]

The following valuable works have been presented to the Library by Mrs. Sutherland.


1852

'Obituary', The Gentleman's Magazine. Volume XXXVII. New Series. MDCCCLII. January to June inclusive. Pp. 615-639; p. 631.

Mrs. Sutherland.

March 18. At Bramley, near Guildford, aged 69. Charlotte, widow of Alexander Hendras Sutherland, esq. F.S.A.

This lady was the eldest daughter of the Rev. William Hussey, M.A. Rector of Sandhurst in Kent, by Charlotte, daughter of William Twopeny, esq. of Rochester. Her husband Mr. Sutherland, who died in 18 , has his monument in the very completely illustrated Clarendon, which his widow generously bestowed on the Bodleian Library at Oxford, and of the contents of which Mrs. Sutherland, at her own expense, had previously printed a very valuable catalogue.

Mrs. Sutherland has, at her sole cost, erected a new aisle to the parish church at Bramley, and at the same time, with excellent taste and at a large expense, restored the whole of the sacred edifice to its presumed original design – removing the ill-suited innovations and obstructions, and creating a large increase of sittings. She afterwards, on finding that additional space for burial was needed, presented the parish with a large plot of ground up the south end of the village, walled it round, and erected in the centre an elegant Gothic chapel, with central tower and spire. On the same site, nearest the road, she also erected school-buildings, with a clock-tower, both ornamental and useful to the inhabitants. While residing at Merrow she nearly rebuilt, and enlarged, the old parish church of that place in the best taste.


1852, June

[Anonymous review of] 'Lives of the Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Clarendon, illustrative of Portraits in his Gallery. By Lady Theresa Lewis. 3 vols. 8vo., 1852', The Quarterly Review. Vol. XCI. Published in June & September, 1852. pp. 196-217; pp. 197-8 & 217.

In our times, moreover, we have seen the court and camp of Charles and Cromwell invaded by plumy paladins and awe-inspiring amazons in hosts; [… 198 …] No end either of royal chamber-women: […] and last, not least, Mrs. Sutherland, with her Clarendon catalogue, printed in two colossal quartos of some 700 pages each, and sold at the moderate price of six guineas—pereant male qui ante nos nostra dixerint.

[… 217 …]

It was about 1795 that Mr. Sutherland, a Russian merchant, took to illustrating the histories of Clarendon and Burnet—to which he devoted his life and fortune, infinitely to his better half's dissatisfaction, before whom printsellers recoiled; but the fair sex, jealous sometimes even of things, brook few rivals in the affections of their liege lords, and none in their purses. A rebuff and some official rudeness at the British Museum, in the days when contributors were chilled and repelled, and an accidental visit to the better-behaved Bodleian, led Mr. Sutherland to exclaim, 'Here my books shall repose!' Yet he bequeathed his collection to his wife, warning her with his last breath, that if she broke it up he would haunt her. The widow accordingly pursued the completion of this 'national work' with the ardour of the departed founder. Finally, this solace of her weeds swelled, after a growth of twenty-three years and an expense of 20,000 l., into sixty-three folio volumes, bursting with 18,742 prints and drawings; then, having herself prepared the ponderous catalogue to which we have alluded before, she consigned the russia-bound regiment to, as we presume, nearly uninterrupted repose in some picturesque closet of the limitless, silent, monumental Bodleian: nor shall we disturb their rest beyond the remark that there lie entombed 713 portraits of Charles and 352 of Cromwell. Copperplates are subject, it would seem, to no less chances and changes than crowns. The head of Cromwell after his death was rubbed out of an engraving by Lombard, and that of Louis XIV. put in its place. The Grand Monarque's turn came next, and his was effaced in favour of Gustavus Adolphus. In due time the Swedish hero disappeared to make way for Cromwell once more-whose head having been again obliterated—that of Charles I. anew graces the copper in a happy, we hope a final, restoration.


1852 August 29

Copy of a letter by William Hussey to the editor of the Quarterly Review, bound into Hope XVI.J.5? on 2nd flyleaf, behind extract from Macray's Annals (see below). The letter appears not to have been published in the Quarterly Review.

(copy.) of letter written by my father.
['of … father' in different hand]

To the Editor of the Quarterly Review.

Sir,

In the last number of the Quarterly Review (CLXXXI. Act: VII of Lady Theresa Lewis's book upon the Clarendon Gallery,) the Reviewer has travelled out of his way, to cast some unworthy and most unfounded imputations upon the memory of the late M.rs Sutherland; which I must request permission to remove, by the insertion of this refutation. I may not myself be disposed to attach much importance to what the Reviewer has written. – But, if not contradicted, it may cause pain in some quarters; and, as I am probably the only person living, who is competent to do it, I undertake the task as an act of duty.

With such of the Reviewer's facts as are true, I find no fault; nor with the sarcasm which he is [2] pleased to heap upon them. But when he indulges in a license beyond the truth, there is just ground for rebuke.

M.r Sutherland had two wives (or better halves, as the Reviewer so elegantly describes the connexion.) In my youth, I have been, during the latter years of the life of the first wife, a frequent and familiar visitor at his table. – It was during her life that M.r Sutherland began, & in great part executed, his collection. There may have been discussions between them on this subject, or others. I can not say that it was not so; and from my own remembered observations, I think it not altogether improbable. But I never saw anything of the kind, nor heard of it.

The Reviewer was probably ignorant of the existence of the former wife. His imputation of the wife's "dissatisfaction" & of the printsellers having "recoiled" [3] before her, is evidently intended to apply to the wife who survived M.r Sutherland, & fulfilled his design. Nothing can be more untrue.

The first wife died in or about 1809: & it was not until some considerable time afterwards, that the lady who became the second wife was even seen by M.r Sutherland. The second marriage was contracted in June 1812. At that time M.r Sutherland had already made great progress with his Collection. Assuredly, his second wife did in no way discourage the undertaking; which was steadily pursued, until his last declining weeks, when he was disabled by the disease under which he finally sank in May 1820. By his will, made some years before his death, & of which I am the surviving Executor, (as I am also the senior brother of the second M.rs Sutherland) he bequeathed, not his collection specifically, but his whole estate, [4] absolutely to his wife, without a word to distinguish "the collection" from the rest of his property, & without a syllable relating to it being contained in the will; nor aught of condition or qualification being attached to the absolute gift. -

With regard to the "warning with his last breath," & the haunting threat, I believe it to be pure fiction. If ever such an incident did occur, it must have been in mere jest, & must have been overheard & misunderstood by some busy reporter. But I utterly disbelieve the whole story.

I was continually (almost daily,) with both husband & wife during the concluding months of M.r Sutherland's life; & I was present with her at his bedside, to hear & receive "his last breath." – I absolutely deny that any such warning or threat, or any semblance of either, was ever uttered in my presence; or that any thing ever occurred to offer a shadow of probability to the allegation of either having been uttered [5] at any time.

I do not doubt that M.r Sutherland did at some time, & in some way, declare to his wife a wish for the completion of the collection; although perhaps I have not actual knowledge of the fact. I do know that he did declare his desire that his collection, whether sold or not, should not be separated; & that he left the disposal of it to the free will of his wife, fettered by no other condition. It was by her that the Bodleian Library was selected as the place of deposit; M.r Sutherland's personal disapprobation of the British Museum for that purpose being by her duly respected. -

So far from betraying any "dissatisfaction," or any want of goodwill to her husband's favorite pursuit, M.rs Sutherland, although not distinguished by any former taste for such a work, & totally wanting in the experience necessary to protect her from imposition & fraud, continued it in compliance with the known taste & wish of her departed husband; & in so doing, put herself entirely into the hands of [6] those recoiling printsellers.

M.r Sutherland was a most precise accountant. At his decease a regular "Profit & Loss" account of this collection was found, made up to the end of the year preceding his death; by which it appeared that he had then expended a sum amounting within a fraction to £ 10,000. His widow expended, as I believe, not less than another sum of equal amount. M.r Sutherland's wealth was by no means large; & if he had had children, it would not have given independence to them. But he was a man of great method and frugality.

It is not necessary for me to express any opinion upon such an appropriation of the bounties of fortune; which, when distributed to less fortunate kindred, might be made so productive of comfort & happiness to many, living perhaps in not unreasonable hope & expectation; too often doomed to end in disappointment; although, in the present case, I think that both M.r Sutherland's kindred, & his wife's also, have good reason to [7] be contented with the ultimate disposal of the residence of the family, as well as her own.

My only purpose is to rescue the memory of the second M.rs Sutherland, now recently numbered with the dead, from imputations & insinuations, unworthy & most undeserved.

I have not any ambition for putting my name into print, & shall therefore prefer your taking only the initial letters. – But if you think it more fitting to give the whole name, you are free to do so. I claim it of your sense of justice to departed worth, to publish my whole appeal. – It is only within the last 24 hours that I have seen the article in the Quarterly Review.

I am, Sir,
Your obedient servant
W. H. [expanded to 'W.m H.(ussey)' in another hand]

Clifton
27.th Aug.t 1852.

29 Aug.t 1852. Sent under cover to John Murray Esq. Albemarle Street, London – But the letter was written in some haste, & the fair copy also (to save the chance of insertion in the No for [8] Sept.r) & I think that in two or three parts the form of words appearing here was not strictly followed in the fair copy sent. I have also in this copy made two small corrections of facts, in which my memory had at first misled me. – I wrote first that M.r S. died in 1819 instead of 1820; & I had said that he had himself selected the Bodleian Library, as the depository, instead of leaving the selection &ec. free to his wife, as now expressed. I have also omitted the repetition of the amount of her expenditure on the collection; which was stated twice in the original letter -

W.H.


1868

Annals of the Bodleian Library, Oxford, A. D. 1598 - A. D. 1867; With a Preliminary Notice of the earlier Library founded in the Fourteenth Century. By the Rev. William Dunn Macray, M.A. Rivingtons. London, Oxford, and Cambridge. 1868. Pp. 254-258. A printed extract of this section, paginated 1-4 and entitled The Sutherland illustrated Clarendon and Burnet, is bound into HopeXVI.J.5? on 2nd flyleaf. The footnotes have been re-numbered for the sake of clarity.

A.D. 1837

The magnificent series of historical prints and drawings which is called, from the name of its collectors and its donor, the Sutherland collection, was presented to the University on May 4 in this year, although it was not actually deposited until March, 18391. The six volumes of the folio editions of Clarendon's History of the Rebellion and Life, and Burnet's Own Times, are inlaid and bound in sixty-one elephant folio volumes, [255] and illustrated with the enormous number of 19,224 portraits of every person and views of every place in any way mentioned in the text, or connected with its subject-matter2. The gathering was commenced in 1795 by Alexander Hendras Sutherland, Esq., F.S.A.; on his death (May 21, 1820) it was taken up by his widow3, who spared neither labour nor money to render it as complete as possible, and by whom its contents were, consequently, nearly doubled. At length, desiring, in accordance with her husband's will, that the results of her own and his labour should be always preserved intact, Mrs. Sutherland presented the whole collection to the Bodleian. Its extent may be in some degree appreciated when it is mentioned that there are (according to Mrs. Sutherland's statement in the preface to the Supplementary Catalogue) 184 portraits of James I, of which 135 are distinct plates; 743 of Charles I, of which 573 are distinct plates, besides sixteen drawings; 373 of Cromwell (253 plates); 552 of Charles II (428 plates); 276 of James II; 175 of Mary II (143 plates); and 431 of William III, of which 363 are separate plates4. There are also 309 views of London and 166 of Westminster. Amongst those of London is a drawing on many sheets, by a Dutch artist, Antonio van den Wyngaerde, executed between 1558-1563. It affords a view which extends from the Palace at Westminster to that at Greenwich, both included; and comprehends also Lambeth Palace and part of Southwark, with the palace [256] there of the Protector Somerset, in which the Mint was situated. The whole amount expended on the formation of the series is estimated at £20,000.

The collection is accompanied by a handsomely printed Catalogue, compiled by Mrs. Sutherland, and published in 1837 in three volumes quarto, two containing the portraits, and one the topography5. A Supplement to this was printed in the following year, in the preface to which Mrs. Sutherland records her transfer of the collection. She adds that 'the University of Oxford, by the manner in which it has received the collection, has afforded her the high gratification of witnessing the fulfilment, in their utmost extent, of the wishes of its founder; and in the liberal step which its future conservators have taken, to insure a direct and easy means of reference to the prints, she finds proof of their intention to comply with her own earnest desire, that the books should be as freely open to those really interested in them as may be consistent with their preservation. Under the superintendence of the compiler, but at the expense of the University, a copy of the Catalogue has been prepared, in which every print is marked with the page which it respectively fills in the volumes; by means of this, every difficulty of reference, and every doubt as to the print intended to be described, is obviated, and the manuscript indices will be preserved from the injury of constant use. In order to prevent the possibility of disappointment in referring from this marked catalogue, every print (with four exceptions only) of which the page has not been ascertained, has been struck out, although probably several of the portraits not at present [257] found are still in the volumes.' The following letter of thanks was addressed by Convocation to the donor6:—

'To Mrs. Sutherland, of Merrow, in the County of Surrey.

'Madam, —We, the Chancellor, Masters and Scholars of the University of Oxford, feel ourselves called upon to acknowledge, in a public and formal manner, the splendid donation recently made by you to our Bodleian Library.

'It is doubtless a source of much gratification to us that our University should have been selected by you as the fittest depository of so valuable a collection; but we are not, on that account, less disposed to appreciate and admire the feeling which has led you to make so considerable a sacrifice, and to relinquish the possession of what has been to you, for many years, an object of constant interest and occupation.

'We shall prize the matchless volumes about to be committed to our care, not merely as being embellished with the richest specimens of the graphic art, but as possessing a real historical character; as enhancing, in no slight degree, the value of works which we have long been accustomed to regard as most important contributions to the annals and literature of our Country.

'Given at our House of Convocation, under our Common Seal, this first day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven7.'

[258]

A few other books were sent by Mrs. Sutherland at the same time, including Boydell's Shakespeare, Heath's Chronicle, Scott's edition of Dalrymple's Preservation of Charles II, Faber's Kit-Cat Club, Wilson's Catalogue of an Amateur, &c. And in 1843 she increased her former gift by the presentation of copies of a large number of illustrated, biographical, and historical works, many of which are in a like manner enriched with additional engravings. Chief amongst these is a copy of Park's edition of Walpole's Royal and Noble Authors, enlarged from five vols. 8o. to 20 vols. 4o. by the insertion of prints, portraits, and some of the original drawings. Similarly enlarged copies of Dr. Dibdin's works are also included; together with framed oil-portraits of Frederic, King of Bohemia, and of Mr. Sutherland.

  1. MS. note by Mrs. Sutherland in the Library copy of her catalogue.
  2. As early as 1819 the collection numbered 10,000 prints, bound in 57 volumes. Clarke's Repert. Bibliogr. Pp. 574-577.
  3. Mrs. Sutherland died March 18, 1852.
  4. In Mrs. Sutherland's own copy of the catalogue (now in the possession of E. L. Hussey, Esq., Oxford), some of these numbers are enlarged in MS. as follows: Charles II, 557, being 432 plates; Cromwell, 379, 255 plates; William III, 436, 367 plates. Amongst the portraits, there are frequently numerous copies of the same plate, being impressions in all its different states. In a few instances (particularly with regard to Charles I) some of the prints entered in the catalogue have not been found in the volumes.
  5. Ten copies were printed of a larger and finer edition, for presentation to various Libraries, but as only four of these (Bodleian, Cambridge University, British Museum, and Bibl. Royale, Paris) acknowledged the gift (the letters from which are preserved in one copy of the catalogue), no more than five copies were printed of the Supplement. Consequently those Libraries which did not return thanks for the gift have now an imperfect book.
  6. It is here printed from the original (written in the beautifully neat hand of the late Registrar, Dr. Bliss,) which is now in the possession of a nephew of Mrs. Sutherland, Edw. Law Hussey, Esq., of Oxford, M.R.C.S. It is sealed with the old University seal, described on p. 1 of these Annals, enclosed in a gold box. The late Rev. R. Hussey, Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History, was one of the brothers of Mrs. Sutherland.
  7. A very erroneous notice of the collection, written in a singularly depreciatory tone, was inserted in an article in the Quarterly Review, in 1852, vol. xci. p. 217. The writer appears to have confounded the facts connected with Gough's preference of the Bodleian to the British Museum (as told in Nichols' Lit. Hist.), or possibly Douce's, with the totally different circumstances of Mrs. Sutherland's gift, whose husband had left the collection entirely at her disposal, provided only that it were not dispersed.

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